Haters Gonna Hate

This week, I read Cathy N. Davidson’s article “Humanities 2.0: Promises, Perils, Predictions”  which was all about the inequality between the humanities and the technological age and how both need to be able to coexist. While I do see Davidson’s point, I honestly believe that the humanities are something that need recognize that while technology does enhance it, it is fully capable of being a force of nature on its own (I know that the humanities are not a physical being, but that is really the only way I feel like I can express my opinion.). While there are some humanists out there making the necessary connections between advancing technology and the humanities, many are not and spinning a tale of “woe is me” and lamenting about the ignorance of the technological age towards the humanities. What I say is this: buck up and recognize the fact that you’re better than everything else in the whole wide world.  😉

In relation to my undergrad studies, I can totally see where Davidson is coming from by demanding a higher recognition for the humanities. After switching from a technical program like interior architecture to a humanities-based major like English, the amount of questions about what I am going to do with an English degree and if I know that and English degree won’t get me anywhere started pouring in. In all honesty, this freaked me out a bit; after being in a program for three years where I already had a predetermined career path to switching in my final year of college to something that would allow me to choose almost any career that I wanted,  I had zero answer for any of those questions. But now I realize that those that bash the humanities don’t need an answer and that haters are gonna hate but at least I know that I value everything I have learned in this past school year more so than in my first three years of college.

 

Until next time.

EMC

explore. muse. create.

 

 

Davidson, Cathy. “Humanities 2.0: Promise, Perils, Predictions.” PMLA 123.3 (2008): 707-17.

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Intros and Conclusions . . . Yay!

Hey everyone! Guess what time it is. No really, guess. I’ll give you a hint: I talk about this book a lot. Like A LOT. If you said The Craft of Research then you are correct! (and I really hope you did because you didn’t have many options to choose from . . .) Anyway, here are some quotes about intros and conclusions that I hope help you as much as they helped me:

 

“To convince readers that they should take your problem seriously, you must state the cost  they will pay if it is not resolved or the benefits  they gain if it is” (239).

This is such an important aspect of writing an introduction that really determines whether or not your reader will continue on with your paper or move on to the next one. When faced with a situation, most people want to know what is in it for them, so if you discover something that is worth reading on about, then make sure that you write your intro in a way that conveys to your reader that your topic will change their lives for the better. I hope that when I finally get around to writing the intro for my final capstone paper, I’m able to do this because my topic— the representation of gender in Disney’s Maleficent— is something that is both current and rarely talked about, so (hopefully) people will see that they will benefit from the knowledge that they would gain and act as a force to change the world for the better. Yay!

 

“You can bring your report to a graceful, even literary close with an echo of your opening fact, anecdote, or quotation” (247).

It wasn’t until last semester that I really ever tried to echo a fancy intro into an even fancier conclusion, but that was really only because I was required to for one of my classes. After doing this, however, I see how this is something that is extremely beneficial for you as a writer because it brings your paper full-circle and helps wrap it up in a neat little package with a bow on top. And then you can hand it in to your teacher like this and know that it is perfect:

Hands holding a gift box isolated on black background

 

Until next time.

EMC

explore. muse. create.

 

 

Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams. The Craft of Research. Third ed. Chicago: U of Chicago, 2008. Print.

Image: asenat29

Continue Learning and Keep On Failing

Are you craving some inspiration after my short hiatus? Here’s some advice from Pollak’s College to Career to fulfill your every wish:

 

“Failure stinks. But make no mistake about it: real failure comes from never trying something in the first place” (181).

Right now, I am in the process of putting my cover letters together to send out to potential employers which is the last thing I need to do to start getting my foot in the door in the adult world. This might sound all fine and dandy, but I have been putting this off for a while, and when I say a while, I mean a LONG WHILE. I really think that this has to do with my fear of failure and rejection because I am too worried about not being good enough for a job. This piece of advice from Pollak is something that I really need to take into consideration and keep in mind when I am applying for jobs because in all honesty, I’m failing myself for not even trying.

 

“Keep learning” (185).

My original plan for after graduation was to go directly into graduate school. Unfortunately for me, the program that I wanted to apply for all started before my graduation date, so I had to put my plan on hold. While I do intend to go back to school in the summer of 2017, I think that Pollak has the right idea with advocating for furthering your education. Taking classes that will help you out in your profession by keeping you up to date with current trends is something that is only beneficial and will put you one step ahead of any potential competition.

 

Until next time.

EMC

explore. muse. create.

 

 

Pollak, Lindsey. Getting from College to Career. Revised ed. New York: HarperCollins, 2012. Print.

The Connection Cannot Be Broken

I can’t tell you how many times that I have heard people say that the humanities are useless in this day and age and how less attention should be paid to them and more to “technical” studies that will pay off in the future. I can tell you, however, that this is 100% wrong, . . . and I have proof to back it up. In the article entitled “A Manifesto for the Humanities in a Technological Age,” both Cathy N. Davidson and David Theo Goldberg suggest that there is not a divide between the humanities and technical studies but a collaboration between the two: each one needs the other in order to flourish in this ever-changing world.

For the past three years up until July of 2015, I had been majoring in interior architecture rather than English. I know that from my experiences as an interior architecture student, Davidson’s and Goldberg’s idea is totally accurate. Throughout those three years, not only was I tasked to create innovative interiors, I was also tasked to create presentations for my designs which included written descriptions of my work, summaries of my process, and spoken presentations in front of established professionals. Without drawing on the humanities to accomplish these tasks would have been impossible; like Davidson and Goldberg say, technical studies and the humanities are connected and cannot be separated. I know that through my own personal experience, this statement is true and I hope that others can see that as well so that that humanities no longer suffer.

 

Until next time.

EMC

explore. muse. create.

 

 

Check out the article here!

Davidson, Cathy N., and David Theo Goldberg. “A Manifesto for the Humanities in a Technological Age.” The Chronicle Review 50.23 (2004): B7-B11. Web. <http://uchri.org/media/pdfs/Manifesto_Humanities.pdf&gt;